Bush Honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii), also known as Amur honeysuckle, is one of the most destructive invasive species in the St. Louis region. Asian bush honeysuckles invade quickly and outcompete native plants. Cut stump:  Cut the plant 4 inches above the ground. References: Controlling Non-Native Invasive Plants in Ohio Forests: Bush Honeysuckle. Bark of mature stems is brown to gray, rough, and often peeling. It shades out native plants in many parts of the country when it escapes cultivation. Compared to native species, they leaf out early and are able to hold their leaves into the fall. Bush honeysuckle refers to several species; the most common to Kentucky is the Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii). Each plant produces thousands of berries as fruit, and each fruit contains 2-6 seeds. Site by Tamarack Media Cooperative. In spring, because they leaf out so early, bush honeysuckles steal light from native plants, such as spring wildflowers and a variety of germinating seeds, which need a sunny forest floor in spring in order to … DNR RESPONSE TO COVID-19: For details on adjustments to DNR services, visit this webpage. There are four invasive species of bush honeysuckle that invade Vermont forests. Flowering begins in early spring before many native shrubs. Seeds are readily dispersed by birds but do not provided nutritional value. Check covered stumps periodically and cut back any new growth. Severely Invasive. In Indiana they are particularly invasive in central and northern parts of the state, but are starting to move into the southern portion. They all are upright deciduous shrubs with long arching branches, and are commonly 5 to 20 feet tall. Non-native honeysuckles displace native forest shrubs and herbaceous plants by their invasive nature and early leaf-out. It can also out compete and shade out native woodland species. These non-native plants thrive in full sunlight, but can tolerate moderate shade, and are therefore aggressive invaders … Sometimes plants are planted purposefully. They shade out herbaceous ground cover and deplete soil moisture. MANHATTAN, Kan. — Asian bush honeysuckle is an invasive species that is slowly taking over Kansas landscapes, negatively impacting wildlife habitat and decreasing local ecosystem functionality. Unfortunately, these plants then spread throughout much of the country. There are four invasive species of bush honeysuckle that invade Vermont forests. Young honeysuckle can easily be pulled from the ground. **, iNaturalist project: Mapping for Healthy Forests Vermont, Northern Spicebush (Lindera benzoin), alternate leaved dogwood (syn. is invasive. Physical removal can also be done but the larger the plant, the harder it will become. They produce an abundance of red to orange-yellow berries. Asian bush honeysuckle is an invasive species that is slowly taking over various Kansas landscapes, negatively impacting wildlife habitat and decreasing local ecosystem functionality. Leaf variation between the different species are listed below: All species' stems older than two years usually have a hollow brown pith or core in the center of the stem. Seeds can remain viable for 3-5 years. The four species of bush honeysuckle that cause most invasive problems (Amur, Morrow's, Tartarian, and Belle) will be referred to as bush honeysuckle. Fly honeysuckle (Lonicera canadensis): This native honeysuckle has many similar characteristics to the non-native varieties but can be easily distinguished by having a solid stem rather than hollow. The species known as "bush honeysuckle" are upright deciduous shrubs with long arching branches, are commonly 6 to 20 feet tall, and have shallow root systems.
2020 invasive bush honeysuckle